Bobaflex: Charlatans Web review Dec21

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Bobaflex: Charlatans Web review

Bobaflex are one of the hardest working bands in the business today. The epitome of rising from the ashes and making something out of nothing, the band have silenced all critics and know exactly what it means to have it all, lose it and get it all back.

Their last album, Hell in My Heart, tells the struggle and pain the band went through to get where they are now and is one of the most emotional breakthrough albums in recent memory.

Needless to say, fans related to it almost instantly and songs like “Bury Me with My Guns,” “Chemical Valley” and “Last Song” have become huge fan favorites.

Bobaflex have finally released Charlatan’s Web, the follow up to Hell in My Heart, and much like its predecessor, it contains some of the band’s most personal and emotional material yet, something they’ve become known and beloved for.

The record kicks off with a spoken word skit, “Charlatan’s Web Intro (Love Letter from a Booking Agent),” which features an insanely real-sounding voicemail from a booking agent telling them how they’ll never go anywhere and how they’re not worth anything.

Songs like “I’m Glad You’re Dead,” “Strangle You” and “Never Coming Back” are beautiful tongue-in-cheek anger-infused tracks that you can’t help but smile at. Bobaflex basically say everything you wish you could say deep down inside and we all have that one person we would dedicate these songs to.

Then there’s lead single, “Bad Man,” which is the perfect rock and roll song. It’s got attitude, it tells it like it is and more.

It all comes down to this- Bobaflex may be veterans to the game, but with everything they’ve gone through and with their newfound success, it’s almost like they’re starting over and a new band. The success they reached with Hell in My Heart is that of which they’re learning how to follow up. Charlatan’s Web is the perfect way to continue the streak and shows they’re really coming into their own.

Rating: 8.5/10

-Reggie Edwards